Ten years after the 2008 financial crisis, we are again facing the possibility of economic turmoil as the Fed and other central banks exit their unconventional monetary policies. Although central banks will move gradually, unforeseen circumstances could trigger a flight to safety and a collapse of asset prices.  Join the Cato Institute for a timely day-long conference that seeks to answer the question what have we learned?

SPEAKERS

Peter Goettler, President and CEO, Cato Institute

Claudio Borio, Head, Monetary and Economic Department, Bank for International Settlements

Josh Zumbrun, National Economics Correspondent, Wall Street Journal

Stephen D. Williamson, Professor and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Chair in Central Banking, University of Western Ontario

George Selgin, Director, Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, Cato Institute

Peter Ireland, Professor of Economics, Boston College

Tobias Adrian, Financial Counsellor and Director, Monetary and Capital Markets Department, International Monetary Fund

Vincent Reinhart, Managing Director, Chief Economist, and Macro Strategist, BNY Mellon Asset Management North America

Lawrence H. White, Professor of Economics, George Mason University

Hon. Phil Gramm, Former Chairman, Senate Banking Committee

Michael D. Bordo, Director, Center for Monetary and Financial History, Rutgers University

Joseph E. Gagnon, Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics

David Beckworth, Senior Research Fellow, Program on Monetary Policy, Mercatus Center, George Mason University

Lydia Mashburn, Managing Director, Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, Cato Institute

Jeffrey M. Lacker, Distinguished Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University

Scott B. Sumner, Director, Program on Monetary Policy, Mercatus Center, George Mason University

Jeffrey A. Frankel, James W. Harpel Professor of Capital Formation and Growth, Kennedy School, Harvard University

John A. Allison, Professor of Practice, Wake Forest University; Chairman, Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, Cato Institute