Please join Atlas Network Trendsetters to hear from Olumayowa Okediran on bringing prosperity to Africa. Mr. Okediran will discuss the importance for Africa to adopt individualism as a means to modernization; the negative effects of Africanised versions of socialism; Boko Haram and the ineptitude of the government in handling Boko Haram; the impact of plummeting oil prices on Nigeria's economy considering oil is Nigeria's primary export; and immigration policies within Africa, specifically to South Africa and Tanzania. He will also discuss the founding of African Students for Liberty and the challenges of expanding to Ethiopia and Gambia and other difficult places, where some of their leaders have been arrested and forced to take refuge in Nigeria.

Learn more about the key trends in the battle for freedom in Africa.

Okediran writes: "If Africa is to embrace modernity, it should look to individualism as a mode of social ordering. Individualism is not domiciled in the West; it is a fundamental means to modernization. I hope to see African intellectuals develop an open mind devoid of dogmatic stereotypes. ... I am optimistic that the climate of ideas among African intellectuals will become more predisposed towards individualism." You can read more here: tinyurl.com/okediran

SPEAKERS

Olumayowa Okediran is a Nigerian socio-economic and political commentator, nonprofit consultant and entrepreneur. Olumayowa’s articles and views on politics and economics have appeared in many prominent international newspapers, and his articles have been translated into French, Spanish and Portuguese. In 2013 he founded African Students For Liberty and is currently the African Programs Manager for Students For Liberty. He has spoken at dozens of universities and conferences around the world and is a co-author of the book Why Liberty: Your Life, Your Choices, Your Future. Olumayowa is a graduate of the Atlas Network Think Tank MBA.


Mr. Okediran is helping to establish free market think tanks all over the continent and working with student groups in Algeria, Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana, Liberia, South Africa, Cameroon, Malawi, Morocco, Burundi, Zambia, Ethiopia and Tanzania.