September 22, 2015 Print

The modern Puerto Madero district in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Buenos Aires is home to a rich culture and history, vibrant nightlife, and some of the best shopping in Latin America. Buenos Aires was also named as one of TripAdvisor’s Travelers’ Choice Destinations for 2015. When you are there, be sure to stop by the historic Cafe Tortoni to check out its legendary tango and jazz performances. In addition to all this city has to offer for tourists and business travelers, it is also home to seven of Atlas Network’s 13 Argentinian partners working toward a more free and prosperous society.

If you are traveling to Buenos Aires on your next South American vacation or business trip, be sure to stay plugged into the freedom movement from the moment you step off the plane by following some of Atlas Network’s top Argentinian partners and their work. Here are three examples:

Panorama of Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Libertad y Progreso (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Libertad y Progreso was formed in 2011 through a merger of three liberty-advancing think tanks. Its mission is to transform Argentina into an open society through public discussion and debate by advocating for individual rights, a free market economy, and limited government. Libertad y Progreso has produced an impressive catalog of investigative works about economic policy.

In 2014, Libertad y Progreso’s Candelaria de Elizalde was the second-place winner of Atlas Network’s Think Tank Shark Tank competition. She received $10,000 in seed funding for her limited government video series project proposal, which was recently produced.

The video series “Aprender Volando” (learning to fly) is a series of 6:00 minute videos that have been viewed nearly 700,000 times. The series stars Gloria Alvarez, a young, libertarian-minded media broadcaster from Guatemala and features videos on the topics of populism vs. a republic, poverty and dependence, and education.

Keep up to date with Libertad y Progreso by visiting its Facebook and Twitter pages.

Caminito, a traditional alley of great cultural significance and a frequent tourism destination, in the district of La Boca in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Junior Achievement Argentina (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Junior Achievement Argentina (JA Argentina), an international education foundation, was founded in the United States in 1919 and opened its doors in Argentina in 1991. Its educational programs have reached more than 700,000 students across Argentina. The mission of JA Argentina is to educate the younger generation about how productivity and respect for individual rights are essential to the value of freedom. The objectives of these educational programs are to instill sound thinking and big ideas that allow the young people of Argentina to be responsible for their own destinies.

In 2015, JA Argentina held its 17th annual “Partners for a Day” educational program in Buenos Aires. This program aims to give youth in Argentina experience with the real-world process of entering the job market. More than 700 students participated in the summer 2015 program and were hosted by companies including, among others, Siemens, General Electric, and Telecom.

JA Argentina is gearing up for its annual Night of Heroes art auction benefit, to be held on Nov. 10. Located at the La Rural convention center in Buenos Aires, this event aims to raise funds for the organization’s educational programs that engage the entrepreneurial spirit in Argentina’s youth.

To learn more about Junior Achievement Argentina and its programs, visit its Facebook and Twitter pages.

Nightly panorama of the Puerto Madero in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Instituto Acton Argentina (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

Instituto Acton Argentina’s mission is to promote a free and virtuous society characterized by the observance of personal rights and the market economy, in harmony with the Catholic faith. Instituto Acton Argentina is considered a thought leader in Buenos Aires and all throughout Latin America on the issues of ethics and culture, religious freedom, and free-market values.

Instituto Acton Argentina holds regular conferences on the Acton Institute’s PovertyCure Project, a six-part miniseries hosted by Michael Matheson Miller that informs the audience of the organization’s faith-based journey to promote entrepreneurial solutions.

Instituto Acton Argentina is known for its Young Acton program, which meets monthly to discuss issues affecting Argentina’s next generation. Each meeting focuses on free-market ideas that will make Argentina a more free and prosperous place. The last meeting was held on Sept. 9, when the group discussed Dr. Gabriel J. Zanotti’s book Economics for Priests. Dr. Zanotti is the academic director of Instituto Acton Argentina and a professor at Catholic University Argentina.

Check out Instituto Acton Argentina’s efforts on its Facebook and Twitter pages.